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A Day in London: 2020

by John Brian Shannon

Welcome to London, 2020. You’re in the former Battersea Power Station where the British International Motor Show is being held this week!

Artist rendering of the renovated Battersea Power Station in London, UK that will be home to Apple Inc.

Artist rendering of the renovated Battersea Power Station in London, UK — Apple’s UK & Commonwealth HQ. Business Insider

Apple Inc’s new UK & Commonwealth HQ is full of Alan Turing-esqe brilliant people glad to be hosting the show in their auric new building — and for the first time anywhere, iDrive (Apple’s shiny new hydrogen powered car) is on public display.

Aside from its obviously stunning design, the best thing about this car is that it can’t be stolen because unless the owner of the car is within a few feet of the car with his/her iPhone on and logged-in to the iDrive app, it is just a piece of aluminum, glass and plastic that can’t go anywhere. There’s no computer or operating system to allow the car do anything at all, save for the iDrive app in your iPhone or iPad.

apple icar concept car in london, uk

Early Apple iCar concept.

No iPhone or iPad? Then you’re not the owner of the car. Because a matching serial number iPhone & iPad is provided with each Apple Car, with thumbprint security and as many passwords or login captchas as you want. It’s up to you.

Even if someone steals your iPhone and manages to locate your car, you can always “Log out of all devices and apps” remotely from any computer or smart phone on the planet — including the app that drives your beautiful new Apple Car. (Stolen car coasts to side of road, wholly inactive)

Now, that’s what I call a user-friendly car ownership experience.


And Brexit, You Ask? Pshaw!

Brexit came and went a long time ago. Neither Project Fear or the extreme Brexiteers were right; The UK coasted through 2019, Brexiting on March 29 as scheduled and other than a temporary blip in the markets things continued as normal. Yes, even the Sun rose in the sky the next day. Astonishing!

But not really. For all the hype, compared to other events taking place in the world Brexit turned out to be a sideshow. Only hyperventilating European politicians on both sides of the English Channel noticed Brexit.

After dipping to 1.2% GDP growth in 2019, the UK recovered and is now looking at 2% growth for 2021 — not due to Brexit — but due to the fact that Remainers are no longer sabotaging the UK economy hoping for it to fail so they could get their way.

Since the summer of 2019, the UK joined the USMCA (the new NAFTA agreement) and the CPTPP, and the new Commonwealth of Nations Free Trade Accord (CNFTA). In 2020, the UK has signed trade agreements with countries that have a combined population of 5 billion+ people.

A free trade deal with the EU (based on the excellent CETA agreement the EU has with Canada) is expected to be signed by the end of 2020 and go into effect on January 1, 2021.

Food shortages, rioting, family strife, civil war? Not a bit of it.

Every politician who tried to make a career out of Brexit is gone. Whether extreme Brexiteer, extreme Remainer, whether continental European or Briton; Every politician who held an extreme Brexit position was invited by their respective parties (and voters, hehehe) to leave politics.

Enjoy the day Britons, legal migrants to the UK, and visitors! You’ve earned it.

Oh, and the UK and the EU signed a modified Withdrawal Agreement on the 11th-hour of March 28th, 2019. But you knew that.

Why the UK Should Match Canada’s 15% Corporate Tax Rate

by John Brian Shannon

Canada’s corporate tax rate remains at 15% and that low tax rate was one of the reasons the country essentially cruised unharmed through the financial crash of 2008 and its bloody aftermath.

Throughout the global financial meltdown Canada easily led all G7 countries in growth (although Canadian growth was curtailed as compared to pre-crash projections) and the country didn’t need to increase taxes, nor make major fiscal or monetary adjustments during that period.

Corporate Income Tax Rates for Canada in 2018.

Corporate Income Tax Rates for Canada in 2018. For active business income — includes all rate changes announced up to June 15, 2018. Information courtesy of www.EY.com

Although the country isn’t thought of as an offshore tax haven by any stretch, having a 14.5% corporate tax rate during the global economic crisis (it’s since risen to 15%) meant the country avoided the exodus of capital that other nations experienced.

That reasonable corporate tax rate as much as any other factor helped Canada to survive and thrive in the face of one of the most damaging economic meltdowns in modern history.

Money fleeing the country to low corporate taxation destinations is NOT what the UK government needs any time over the next decade.


Will There be Another Recession?

Of course there will be another recession. Recessions in Western countries occur every 25-years on average although unexpected economic shocks have been known to occur. Just because the average interregnum is 25-years, doesn’t mean recessions can’t also happen randomly — which means that the UK needs to begin playing it smart, now, to better survive the next global downturn.


Why Match Canada’s Rate?

Canada’s corporate tax rate just happens to fall within an economic ‘sweet spot’ — high enough that it doesn’t get named and shamed as an offshore tax haven (which tend to get a lot of bad press when a recession is on) yet is close enough to other developed nation corporate tax rates that it doesn’t get a bad reputation.

All else being equal, you want to go with what works. And Canada’s low corporate taxation plan worked wonders to help the country coast through the last recession — and it performed even better than expected, pre- and post-recession.

Sure, there were nervous moments here and there, nobody denies that. But that 15% rate combined with a steady hand on the economic tiller by Mr. Mark Carney then-governor of the Bank of Canada (now governor of the Bank of England) and the country under the steady leadership of (then-Prime Minister) Stephen Harper added gravitas and confidence to the Canadian economy at a time it was needed.

That’s all it takes to survive and thrive in recessionary times, folks.


Philip Hammond’s Next Budget

UK Chancellor of the Exchequer Philip Hammond should match Canada’s corporate income tax rates exactly, and publicly commit to that at Spring Budget 2019. Or even better, in Autumn Budget 2018.

Due to Brexit there is a real need to write both a spring and autumn budget each year, at least until the 2-year implementation period is complete.

Lowering corporate taxes could mean less revenue for HM government. That’s a possibility. But there are positives to a lower corporate income tax rate for the UK, particularly during the present economic uncertainty:

  1. More companies will move their headquarters to the UK to obtain a better corporate tax rate.
  2. More UK companies will decide to stay in the UK rather than leave it for (perceived) greener pastures during this period of economic uncertainty, although they could well have plans to return 5-years on from Brexit. (But can you count on that?)
  3. UK-based companies will have more money to invest in their UK operations, to increase non-labour purchases, and perhaps expand their existing factories, facilities, or number of retail outlets.
  4. UK companies that presently fear Brexit may hurt their business may find that as the UK corporate income tax rate falls to 15% it gives them a competitive advantage of 5% they didn’t have prior to this (proposal). Less fear and better after-tax profits. ‘Gotta like that’ said every CEO ever.
  5. Instead of the government needing to stimulate the economy, increased spending by UK companies flush with newfound cash will help to stabilize the economy now and through the 2-year implementation period via increased spending and hiring.
  6. Hiring more workers with a 5% tax savings means more revenue for HM government — as many of those workers will earn enough to pay an average 45%-55% personal income tax rate.

That’s just a short list of the benefits of lowering the corporate income tax rate to 15% and if the tax reduction announcement is timed correctly HM Revenue and Customs shouldn’t suffer any loss of revenue — and it’s possible that HMRC may receive slightly more revenue courtesy of additional personal income tax contributions if companies go on a hiring spree with their saved money.


Here’s a bonus graphic to show *what can happen* when you cut the UK corporate income tax rate…

UK Corporate Income Tax Rate drop

UK Corporate Income Tax Rate drop increased tax revenue by 50% from 2010-2016. Image courtesy Daily Mail.

Is Growth Possible in a Brexit Economy?

by John Brian Shannon

“KPMG predicts economic growth of 1.4 per cent next year, but cuts this to 0.6 per cent if Britain leaves the EU without a deal.”The Times

While some firms predict slower than normal growth for the UK economy in the post-Brexit timeframe, it’s always good to reflect on the assumptions that forecasters employ in creating their reports and why such forecasts can cause more harm than good.

  1. If you tell your employees that, ‘the chips are down, the economy is sinking, and corporate belt-tightening isn’t far off’ they are likely to respond in a negative way. Some may look for other employment, some will opt for early retirement, while others spend more time in the staff room talking with their coworkers about their employment concerns than getting their work done. Which means such reports can actually cause the negative outcome they’re warning about. It’s human nature to perform to a predicted level instead of trying to exceed expectations. There are few exceptions to this behavior and they are called names like; Olympic athlete, Pulitzer Prize Winner, President, or Astronaut who have the innate ability to ‘power through’ the negative times without losing momentum.
  2. Such reports deal with known inputs only. For example, a zero-tariff trade deal with the Americans may seem far off today, but by 2020 it may already be signed. And not only the U.S., other political and trade blocs are likely to sign trade deals with the UK following Brexit. The AU (Africa), MERCOSUR (the South American trade bloc), the Pacific Alliance (several Pacific nations), the CPTPP (the Comprehensive and Progressive Agreement for Trans-Pacific Partnership) nations, ASEAN (the Association of Southeast Asian Nations), The Commonwealth (Commonwealth of Nations), and China, are likely to expand their trade links with the UK after it departs the European Union. America and those seven trading areas will have a combined total of 7.0 billion people by 2020. That’s a lot of potential consumers, and the massive opportunities presented by signing zero-tariff trade deals post-Brexit are absent in most economic projections by design. Even if the UK were to sign only one free trade deal (with the U.S., for example) it could improve UK growth by a full 2 per cent or more. Presto! A shiny new UK economy!
  3. “Now we’ve got them!” While economic forecasting provides vital information for policymakers, Brexit negotiators aren’t helped by the news that growth will slow even in the face of a ‘good Brexit deal’ and will slow moreso in a ‘no Brexit deal’ scenario. It’s the kind of report that makes Michel Barnier’s day! KPMG is certainly one of the most respected firms around, but if you’re a Brexiteer and a report like this has been released to the public instead of it remaining in the hands of policymakers it plays with your mind; “Are they working for the UK’s best interests or are they working for the EU’s best interests?” (and) “Who commissioned (who paid for) this report and what parameters were used?”

So, while the good people of KPMG do their best to provide policymakers with the best near-term assessment of the UK economy, making such reports public can actually cause the negative things to occur about which the report warns.

That’s why policymakers everywhere must be ahead of the curve and treat all such documents as ‘the worst-case scenario’ without exception.

Now that UK Prime Minister Theresa May has been reliably informed that the worst the UK can do is 0.6 per cent growth between now and 2020, it should be an easy matter to arrange a number of free trade deals and blow the doors off that projection by 3 or 4 per cent by 2020.

Looking at this in the proper context means accepting that exiting the European Union is merely a necessary stepping stone to get the UK to 4 per cent growth by 2020 — which should result in Theresa May keeping the PM’s chair for at least one more term and with all past ‘political sins’ forgiven.

Not a bad deal Theresa, if you’re up for it! 🙂