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If There Were Ever a Time for an Anglosphere Summit – it’s Now!

by John Brian Shannon

International summits are wonderful events. Heads of state, cabinet officers and their staffs, CEO’s, various think tanks and special guest speakers get together to discuss policies and innovative solutions to common problems faced by their group. Yet, in over two-hundred years of the modern political era, Anglosphere nations have never held a summit dedicated to Anglo nations. Inexplicable!

It’s time for the leaders of the United Kingdom and the United States to reach out to all English-speaking nations such as Canada, Australia, New Zealand and other primarily English-speaking nations to invite them to an Anglosphere Summit this year. (Yes! THIS year!)


Announcing the First Annual Anglosphere Summit: Anglosphere Summit 1.0 (Synergy)

A simple three-day format could be employed for the first annual Anglosphere Summit where the first day (1/3 of the programme) could help broaden the understanding of what the Anglosphere as a whole has contributed in the 20th-century (and more to the point, what it has accomplished in the 21st-century) via gigantic video projections and guest speakers on each topic, the second day (1/3 of the programme) could be devoted to present-day challenges for Anglosphere nations, while the final day could suggest conventional and innovative solutions to problems faced by Anglosphere nations, complete with photo opportunities, signing ceremonies, along with an award for the most-improved economy over the previous year.

And finally, the greatest strengths of Anglo nations have always been their respective economies, their combined economic power, and their per capita economic power, backed by their always-loyal military institutions. A deep commitment to international trade and a powerful but well-disciplined military are a world-beating combination that can’t ever be taken for granted by Anglo political leaders.


The Venue

Each year, one Anglosphere nation could offer to host the Anglosphere Summit and tailor the experience so that each attendee can learn about the host country’s successes and failures in governance, policies, social structures, and industry, allowing attendees to take home that knowledge and build a better country.

Such luminaries as Bill Gates (computing) Bill Ford Jr. (automotive industry) Richard Branson (airlines, tourism) Jim Rogers (energy) Arnold Schwarzenegger (governance, movie industry, renewable energy) Elon Musk (TESLA, Space-X, SolarCity, PayPal, Ebay) and other entrepreneurs could deliver compelling presentations to participants, bringing them up-to-the-minute information on their fields of expertise.

Such resources the Anglosphere has available to them(!!!) but the experience of these stellar people are criminally underutilized by Anglosphere politicians and policymakers. Unforgivable!

After the summit concludes, everything could remain in place for two weeks to allow the public to hear the recorded speeches and see the exhibits at the venue, and to watch the same informational videos in the same setting as Anglosphere leaders.


Summary

Leaders of Anglosphere countries need to lead. They need to synergize their efforts to compete in the global marketplace. And they need the support of all English-speaking countries to confront common domestic and international problems. There has never been a better time to work together!


Related Articles:

  • La Francophonie websiteLa Francophonie is a great organization dedicated to the betterment of all people living in French-speaking nations and it does incredible development work around the globe, much of it focused on poverty-stricken and up-and-coming French-speaking nations. Je salue la Francophonie!
  • The Commonwealth of Nations website — an organization dedicated to the United Kingdom and its historical colonies that are now full-fledged nations, and some new member countries. (Some are English-speaking nations, while others aren’t) “The Commonwealth is an association of sovereign nations which support each other and work together towards international goals. With their common heritage in language, culture, law, education and democratic traditions, among other things, Commonwealth countries are able to work together in an atmosphere of greater trust and understanding than generally prevails among nations.”
  • The CANZUK nations website — a group dedicated to increased cooperation between the ‘CANZUK’ countries — Canada, Australia, New Zealand and the United Kingdom (hence the abbreviation, CANZUK) that extends its membership to other like-minded nations. “CANZUK International (CI) is the leading group advocating closer ties between Canada, Australia, New Zealand and the United Kingdom, known amongst diplomats at the United Nations as the ‘CANZUK Group’. These four countries have shared commercial ties, geopolitical aspirations and a venerable constitutional tradition over centuries. Amongst CI’s aims is freedom of movement within the CANZUK Group for the citizens of Canada, Australia, New Zealand and the United Kingdom. In addition, it regards loyalty to the same monarch as an essential symbol of a common heritage and the cornerstone of constitutional democracy. More specifically, it is envisaged that the CANZUK Group would collaborate in the following areas: – Free Trade – Foreign Policy – Constitutional Affairs. The four leading Commonwealth realms could build upon existing economic, diplomatic and institutional ties to forge a cohesive alliance of nation-states with a truly global outlook.”
  • Trump says he is working on ‘very big and exciting’ trade deal with UK (Sky News)

This Week in Brexit: Trump Promises a Trade Deal

by John Brian Shannon

On the sidelines of the G20 Hamburg summit, U.S. President Trump found time to meet with UK Prime Minister May and to offer welcome words that the United States will sign a bilateral trade deal with the UK as soon as Brexit is complete.

It’s very good news for the UK and also for PM Theresa May (who has had a rough time in domestic politics of late) and it was obvious that the U.S. president went out of his way to assure Ms. May that a reciprocal trade agreement — one that works for both America and for Britain — is one of his administration priorities.

So much of the UK’s post-Brexit success will hinge on bilateral trade accords because no matter how good the final Brexit agreement, there will be some amount of economic adjustment for Britain in the months following Brexit. A quick trade agreement with the United States will not only ease the Brexit transition, but also  improve the UK (and America’s) economy indefinitely.

It was a classy thing for Mr. Trump to do for Theresa May knowing that her domestic political fortunes have taken a hit. Let’s hope the Prime Minister is able to return the favour at some point during the Trump administration. That sort of respect makes for strong allies.

During WWI, but especially during WWII the relationship between America and Britain was raised to a very high level by Prime Minister Winston Churchill and President Harry S. Truman, and in the postwar era during a time of unprecedented economic growth, President Ike Eisenhower continued the wise course set by his predecessor.

However, it could’ve so easily gone the other way if the leaders hadn’t gotten along.

Both sides would’ve missed geopolitical opportunities of huge importance such as the formation of NATO, the establishment of the Nuremberg trials and the creation of other institutions and agreements such as Bretton Woods and the IMF. Without the ambition of the UK and the power of the United States those things simply wouldn’t have occurred.

Millions of Americans and Britons prospered over the past 72 years because their postwar political leaders *didn’t drop the ball* and made a conscious decision to *make the best of the postwar relationship* for their respective people.


What Kind of Free Trade Agreement Should Prime Minister May and President Trump pursue?

Present-day Prime Minister of Canada Justin Trudeau was still in school when Canada first approached the European Union to ask about a bilateral trade deal, and that many years later it still hasn’t come into effect. (It’s about to, they say)

It will have taken eight years to hammer out and begin to abide by, the Comprehensive Economic and Trade Agreement (CETA) which arrives so late in the game and market conditions do change over time (remember way back to the 2008/09 financial crisis when the CETA agreement was first floated?) that some of the hard-won negotiating points are no longer relevant and may never be finalized.

Canada, EU to provisionally apply CETA in September (CBC)

I’m sure it’s a fine agreement and congratulations are due. However, with America and Britain at the controls of a mutually beneficial trade agreement between two friendly Anglophone nations, it should take less than a year from first discussion to signed agreement.

Though we don’t know what shape an Anglo-American trade agreement might look like from our vantage point in July of 2017, probably the best idea would be for both sides to embrace reciprocity and fair dealing in all trade matters as a way to enhance both economies, and as a way to later attract other Anglophone nations such as Canada, Australia and New Zealand to sign on to such an agreement.

Hitting the Right Note with Commonwealth of Nations member India

What a great thing it would be if all Commonwealth nations eventually agreed to sign on to a U.S. / UK trade agreement. Commonwealth of Nations member India has 1.5 billion consumers alone!

Both America and Britain could add 5% to their respective GDP just on the improved trade flows of doing business in the booming Indian economy.

“Although India’s rapid population growth is part of what accounts for the forecasted jump […] that is only part of the story. Drastic improvement in terms of per-person productivity due to capital investments and better technology will play an even more important role.

“PwC predicts that India’s economy will grow by about 4.9% per year from 2016 to 2050, with only 0.7% of that growth caused by population growth.

“India’s economy is currently the third-largest in the world, and is expanding at an estimated annual growth rate of 7.1% for the 2016-17 financial year. —  India’s economy is forecast to surpass that of the US by 2040 (Quartz)

Both America and Britain just need to hit the right note with India — a respectful note — in order to profit from the massive growth that is available in that burgeoning country.

Working out an Anglo-American trade agreement with a view to adding all Commonwealth member nations within 24 months, guarantees that other powerful trade blocs don’t beat the Anglo-American alliance to supply the rocketing Indian economy with much-needed goods and services.

Projected growth for selected countries – As measured by Purchasing Power Parity (PPP)

Projected GDP growth UK 2016-2050 PwC

Projected GDP growth UK and other countries 2016-2050. Image courtesy of Quartz.com


It’s so obvious but still worth repeating; ‘Hitch your wagon to the fastest horses if you want to place well in the race.’

Britain has the Commonwealth of Nations connections, Britain needs a trade agreement with NATO ally America and with Commonwealth partner India, and the United States wants to increase mutually beneficial trade with Britain and its 2-billion-strong Commonwealth partners.

In all of human history, rarely has such a synergistic match-up suddenly appeared where different but extremely valuable benefits are available to all three parties.

Just as nobody predicted the massive Japanese economic boom which began to form the day after WWII ended, an Anglo-American trade agreement, followed by a Commonwealth trade agreement (before other trade blocs grab the low-hanging fruit!) could match or exceed the massive performance statistics of the postwar Japanese economy.

Dear United States and Commonwealth of Nations, Let’s not miss this rather obvious ‘Win-Win-Win’ opportunity!

Money… Money Changes Everything!

by John Brian Shannon

At this moment in UK history, more money is needed to fund the NHS, schools, roads, railways, airports and other national infrastructure, Trident, foreign aid — and to fund 500 million sterling worth of renovations to the House of Commons.

Money is certainly the problem, as more money would solve all of those issues and many more.

Unfortunately, some governments ‘rob Peter to pay Paul’ but with little change in the total amount of revenue actually collected by the government.

  • In some cases, a socialist (Labour) government will raise more revenue by raising taxes. Let the wailing begin!
  • In other cases, a conservative (Conservative and Unionist) government will cut expenditures via fiscal and budgetary belt-tightening. Groan!

Which is why governments everywhere are always on the hunt for more money.

But are they? Are they really on the hunt for money? Are they really trying to increase revenue? Or do they automatically hit their default mode every time a budget crisis looms?

Some observers think that governments dismiss attempts to increase revenue via increased trade with other nations too quickly and move to their particular default mode.


Where Could the UK Find 1.3 Billion Consumers Wanting to Buy British Goods?

Well, India, for one. And they’re a Commonwealth nation. Ta-Da! See? It’s sooo simple.

All the UK government must do is to reach out to India’s leaders (especially post-Brexit, but nothing stopping them from getting started now!) in the interests of ramping-up trade by at least one order of magnitude.

Why should India purchase trillions of rupees worth of goods from non-Commonwealth nations when they could purchase them from the UK?

Why does India purchase their aircraft carriers from Russia, their fighter-bombers from Russia, other significant navy ships from Russia, and billions worth of goods from China, the southeast Asian nations, and the United States?

A century ago, Great Britain’s trade relations with India were booming. Shipyards couldn’t build ships fast enough to keep up with the annual increase in trade.

Who dropped the ball?

Heads should roll for allowing that relationship to falter — a relationship of prime importance to both the UK and to India!


Never Mind Playing the ‘Blame Game’ There’s No Time!

UK Trade With India

Instead of UK government departments fighting each other for funding, the government should work to ramp-up trade with India to increase Britain’s GDP by 5 per cent.

We need to get a piece of that rapidly growing and rapidly modernizing economy, and thereby add five per cent to Britain’s annual GDP.

Yes! More money will solve all of Britain’s spending problems… but it isn’t going to fall out of the sky and land in the Treasury building by itself!

Someone! Anyone! Perhaps the Prime Minister or the Foreign and Commonwealth Secretary (or both) along with the Queen should invite Prime Minister Modi of India and his high officials to London, for an unprecedented and long overdue re-look at the macro relationship between the two countries to see how increased trade could improve the economies of both nations, and how each nation can play to their own strengths and work to offset each other’s weaknesses.


Instead of UK Government Departments Fighting Each Other for Funding – Increase the Available Revenue Pool for All Departments

Companies fight over ‘market share’ because that’s what companies do. And it is often a vicious competition.

However, governments have an unparalleled advantage here because they can increase the overall size of the market — which, using this metaphor, relates to UK GDP.

By dramatically ramping-up trade with India the government could increase GDP by five per cent, easily meet the spending requirements of all departments and still have the economic clout to run balanced budgets indefinitely.

This so badly needs to be done that Brexit is a side-show by comparison, although without Brexit it would be difficult to enter into new trade arrangements with any non-EU country.

In summary, Brexit is merely the means to an end — an end with a much stronger economy for both Britain and India, and a stronger Commonwealth partnership.