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Should Theresa May Consider a 2nd Brexit Referendum?

by John Brian Shannon

The People of the United Kingdom voted in the June 23, 2016 Brexit referendum to decide whether to continue their country’s EU membership — a vote won by the Leave campaign with a 52-48 per cent margin of victory.

This was followed by a General Election on June 8, 2017 — a vote on the confidence that UK voters felt in Theresa May’s new-ish government — but it also verified that voters still believed in a government that campaigned on Brexit.

Therefore, under no circumstances should Brexit referendum do-overs be entertained.

Whether Theresa May agrees with Brexit or not (apparently she’s a closet Remainer) the fact is that over 17 million Britons voted to Leave the European Union and their wishes need to be honoured. Nothing else is important here except for the will of the majority.

Some (like UKIP’s Nigel Farage) worry that the longer Brexit drags on, the more opportunities for the well-organized and well-funded (globalist) Remainers to slow and obfuscate the divorce process — to the point that even if the UK does secure a ‘Brexit’ it may be in name only; e.g.: a ‘Soft Brexit’. For that reason it’s too risky to go one more day than necessary to arrive at the Brexit finish-line.

And let’s not forget, large amounts of money are flying out the window every day into EU coffers at £8.6 billion (net) per year — and every additional delay costs UK taxpayers an additional £717,000,000 (net) per month!

What’s to be gained by additional delay? The People voted for Brexit. It’s time to get on with the job and for Remainers to stop having fantasies about referendum-after-referendum until they get the result they want.

Brexiteers (and other Britons who believe in real democracy) want no more delays, no more BS — they want their Brexit now, and if it takes longer on account of delays by a minority of citizens and by those serving in the House of Commons who care more about the EU than they do about the UK, the pressure from Brexiteers to seek an instant WTO-style Brexit will increase accordingly. And I will be with them on that.

The UK is either a democratic country or it isn’t. We’ll soon know, because if another referendum is held to appease Remainers it will prove to Brexiteers that the hard-won and venerable UK democracy model is broken. Any scenario that involves having referendum-after-referendum until the losing side obtains the result it wants isn’t a working democracy!

And a society where more than 52% of the population believes that democracy in the country no longer functions will create a bigger headache for the government than whether to Leave the EU. Civil wars have started over less.


No Taxation Without Representation!

by John Brian Shannon

“No Taxation Without Representation!” was a term coined by Reverend Jonathan Mayhew in a sermon in Boston in 1750.

By 1761 the terminology was changed by James Otis who said; “Taxation without representation is tyranny!” referring to the level of resentment felt by American colonists at being taxed by a British Parliament where the colonists elected no representatives and received no tangible benefit.

It became an anti-British slogan in the years leading up to the American Revolution. Eventually Britain lost control of its colony, and after a dreadful war that colony became known as the United States of America.

They say the only two certainties in life are Death and Taxes. But surely not far behind is the Negative Fallout of taxation without representation.

And in the 1700’s Britain made a costly error. After all, how many can say they once owned the territory we now call North America and lost it?

Some 250 years later, the EU Parliament having failed to learn one of the most important lessons of modern history, is now doing a similar thing.

The EU Parliament wants to tax Britons, but not allow them representation in the European Union Parliament from March 29, 2017 through March 29, 2019 — even though Britain will remain a dues-paying European Union member during that time.

The un-democrats in Brussels think it’s fine to continue taxing Britons £30 million (net) per day but won’t allow them a seat at the table! That totals £22 billion from March 2017 to March 2019, in exchange for exactly zero decision-making ability during that time.

British MEP’s (Member of the European Parliament) can make statements, answer questions and challenge EU MEP’s on their assertions, but they can’t enter any room where actual EU decisions are made, nor will they be allowed to vote on legislation in the EU Parliament.

Which isn’t democratic! No public relations agency on Earth could spin that situation into an example of democracy.

When British taxpayers are paying £22 billion over two years with no political representation, it’s a textbook case of taxation without representation.

The question to ask yourself is; Could Britain spend that £22 billion ‘better’ than the EU?

Were I Prime Minister Theresa May, I wouldn’t unilaterally pull out of the EU via the WTO route, because this situation hasn’t begun to gather momentum!

Once British taxpayers realize that they are (and have been for a long time!) sending £30 million per day to the EU and now British MEP’s can’t vote on EU legislation, they’ll realize how badly they’ve been used.

The longer this goes on, the better for the Brexit camp as it shows what the European Union is all about. And in Britain’s case, it was always about using Britain as a cash cow to fund EU priorities while flying under the media radar.

“Fool me once, it’s your fault. Fool me twice, and it’s my fault.”

Not only does the EU Parliament want Britain to continue to subsidize the European Union to the tune of £30 million per day until March 29, 2019 — it also wants Britain to pay a £52 billion ‘divorce payment’ now and in full — before Brexit negotiations begin.

The question to ask yourself is; Could Britain spend that £52 billion ‘better’ than the EU?

Nigel Farage called it the EU ‘Mafia’ racket (which he later retracted) while others having come to the realization of what it represents to the British taxpayer will rightfully conclude it’s a case of taxation without representation via extortion — because the EU won’t allow Brexit negotiations to proceed until the payola is received.

The European Union wants 74 billion pounds (in total) before Brexit negotiations begin

The EU wants Britain to pay £74 billion before Brexit negotiations begin but won’t allow Britain a seat at the EU decision-making table even as Britain remains a dues-paying member of the European Union.

And that isn’t democracy, that’s tyranny mixed with kleptocracy.

Related Article:

Why Britain needs a dedicated Minister for Europe

by John Brian Shannon | September 21, 2016

It is a time of change and a time of renewal in old Europa.

Three countries are leaving or have already left the European Union. Greenland opted to leave in 2009, the residents of Switzerland voted in a countrywide referendum to leave the EU in 2014, and in 2016 Britons voted to Brexit.

Not only that, but Italy decides by countrywide referendum whether to stay in the EU this December, while the Netherlands, France, and Hungary have upcoming elections and strong anti-EU political parties pushing for referenda to exit from the European Union.

Norway never did join the EU, but co-exists with the EU via the EEA and EFTA models. And Norway’s economy and people are doing very well, to say the least.

It’s not WWII scale of change in Europe, thankfully. It’s not even Marshall Plan reconstruction of Europe scale of change. But Europe is changing, it’s a work-in-progress, and there is much that could still go right, or wrong, for the European project.

Creating a Minister for European Affairs

Which is why Prime Minister Theresa May should create a new position in her government of Minister for Europe which would cover everything Europe on behalf of the British government.

For the Foreign Secretary to try to cover all things Europe at this time of unprecedented change in Europe — and to build and nurture relationships between Britain and every other country in the world, is simply asking too much from one human being. The Foreign Secretary’s job is a full time job, and that’s under normal circumstances.

While a Minister for Europe would be a full time job with significant challenges involved as some of the 27 EU nations seek to delay, derail, or persuade Britain to remain in the EU (not because it will benefit the UK, but because that’s what will benefit their particular country) even as others seek to punish UK voters for choosing to Brexit.

The Minister for Brexit portfolio only deals with relations between the UK and the European Union, while a Minister for Europe would cover all socio-economic and military-security relations (and more) with every country from Iceland in the west to Ukraine in the east, from Norway in the north to Spain’s southern islands off the coast of Africa, in the south.

There is so much more going on in Europe these days beyond the mandate of Minister for Brexit, that it will take a full time and highly dedicated person to oversee all things Europe. It’s a big territory and it’s sure to be a big job.

Choosing the best Minister for European Affairs

And for that, you need someone larger than life — someone like Nigel Farage, who isn’t afraid of anyone, anywhere, for any reason. At no time would anyone ever think that Nigel wasn’t fully devoted to protecting Britain and helping her to grow to her best potential. Even his political opponents would attest to that.

Mr. Farage created and led the UKIP political party to great heights in a very few years, culminating in the Brexit vote, and Nigel Farage made it look easy every day of the year.

I couldn’t imagine anyone more suited to the job than Nigel Farage, nor could anyone approach his future success in all of the UK’s dealings with Europe, from Iceland to Ukraine and everything in between.

Thus far, PM Theresa May has made some smart moves, hiring Nigel Farage as Minister for Europe could prove to be the smartest move of all.

Britain - Nigel Farage at the UK Parliament Buildings

Britain – It’s a time of profound change in Europe which makes it the time for Theresa May to appoint a dedicated and energetic Minister for Europe. Nigel Farage at the UK Parliament Buildings. Image courtesy of The Spectator